2020 Rolls Royce Ghost: Comfort, Class and Luxury

Rolls Royce, the pinnacle of luxury and prestige, the Ghost first launched in 2009 always looked like it was dwarfed by its bigger brother the Phantom; and to be honest I never quite liked the way it looked. It just looked like a more expensive BMW 7 Series with a Rolls Royce badge, but the Ghost, even though it shares its platform with the latest BMW 7 Series but it is miles apart. If you haven’t already, check out my review of the Rolls Royce Cullinan.

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Let’s start with the exterior; the looks are where the new Ghost thrives and, I think it looks even better than the current Phantom. Not to mention it’s a lot easier to drive and park, though weighing in at 2.5 tonnes and 5 metres long, and over 2 metres wide doesn’t exactly mean it’ll be the most versatile of cars. Then again, starting prices around £250,000, one doesn’t buy it versatility, instead of for comfort, class and luxury. Now, when I mentioned earlier about the new Ghost being based off the BMW 7 Series in comparison to the previous Ghost, the only components shared with the latest and old model are the Spirit of Ecstasy and the hidden umbrellas found within the doors. Everything else is entirely brand new; the new Rolls Royce Ghost really is brand new and a completely revised edition to the already prestigious luxury brand. Furthermore, the brands latest aluminium chassis is also shared with the Cullinan and with the flagship Phantom.

The performance, engine and drivetrain in the new Ghost remain quite old fashioned. Equipped with a sufficient 6.75 litre twin-turbo V12 producing 563bhp and around 850 Nm of torque, acceleration and top speed doesn’t matter in a Rolls Royce, but since you’re here might as well 0-62 mph is achieved in around 4.4 seconds and onto a top speed of 155 mph. Which for a 2.5-tonne luxury yacht isn’t all too bad, then again, who buys a Rolls Royce for its performance. That being said, the company did state that the new Ghost is designed more as a ‘driver’s car’. Though once inside its apparent that there are no buttons to adjust the driving features such gearbox response and the suspension, nor are there any driving modes other than D for drive, N for Neutral, R for reverse and P for park. One would imagine that the Rolls Royce Ghost is a car designed more for those who want to drive the vehicle themselves instead of being driven in it.

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Saving the best for last, the interior, this without a shadow of a doubt is where the Ghost thrives, this is its natural habitat and its unique selling point. First off there’s around 100kg worth of sound insulation to improve refinement, which means you won’t hear anything from the outside world once the doors are closed. Once inside you step into a world utterly different from the one you just came from, you’re welcomed by carpets and leather galore. Quality and luxury are seen on everything you touch and feel, you won’t see cheap plastic here, and most of all those Rolls Royce branded umbrellas are found hidden within the passenger doors. Ensuring that if you’re ever forced to leave the comfort of the Ghost at least, you won’t be wet, and if you’re entering from the wet outdoors, the channels for the umbrellas are heated to dry them out for you.

Summing up the 2020 Rolls Royce Ghost, it upholds if not surpasses typical Rolls Royce standards, a car that is both luxurious and quiet ensures that no matter where you go. You’ll always be at peace, feeling calm and relaxed. It’s a car that works well for long journeys or plotting around town, but most of all, the new Ghost has set a new standard for what the brand represents and being six years in development the hard work has paid off, and it shows.

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Sources:

https://www.rolls-roycemotorcars.com/en_GB/showroom/ghost-in-detail.html

https://www.autoexpress.co.uk/rolls-royce/ghost/353205/new-rolls-royce-ghost-2020-review

Images:

Car Magazine

HD Car Wallpapers

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